UK Tuition Fees Explained in 7 minutes

Mind The Grad 1 159 subscribers

Hey guys! Moving to the UK for University is not just an amazing experience, it can also be a financial burden on you and your family. Whilst we don't want to discourage you, we urge you to think very carefully about this decision and weigh all the pros and cons. We'll tell you how much the University (College) fees are and what is covered. Hopefully, after watching this video you will be able to decide if you can afford to move to UK for University, but also some of the alternative paths. Please comment below with your questions and we'll get back to you!

7 Comments

  • In Scotland there are no fees at university for someone from the EU. I am surprised that you did not mention this fact.

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  • Hi darling please i need ur advice so am doing a settlemnt visa to move and love with my husband in uk and i have Bachelor degree in political science in algeria what to do to have the équivalent degree in the uk. . Which university and what about the fees for somone doesnt need résidence there ill live with my husband

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  • Which universities are good in Master of Science in Accounting and are affordable.

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  • Do you have any recommendations for universities in the UK with a classics bachelor? I’d be an international student from the US and am looking for something pretty affordable

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  • Hi! What are some good universities or cities in the UK for an international student (from US) wanting to major in Communications? I want a University that has a great social atmosphere and affordable living since I won’t want to focus on working out there, just school.

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  • Hey please answer me, i have question about Greenwich university!

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  • Nice summary of it all! Just one thing I wanted to say. The normal length of a bachelor's degree course in the UK is 3 years, so that can look attractive if in your country it's normally longer. That's only 3 years of fees and living costs to pay for. Great! But why is this? Because university starts at a high level. British students will have narrowed down at the age of 16 to just 3 or 4 subjects to study for A level. (Or Highers and Advanced Highers if they're in Scotland.) So by the age of 18, they'll have done those subjects to a level that in other countries might be the first year of university. And that's where British universities START from! For example, my A levels are in pure mathematics, physics and chemistry, which is quite a normal combination for anyone who is interested in technical things and wants to go on to do more physical science or engineering. It meant I had studied NOTHING else for 2 years, but what I HAD studied, I'd studied a lot of. For instance, I'd done a lot of calculus, which in some countries you only get to in mathematics at university. So if your country does it differently, you might find you don't even qualify to enter the course. For an example of that, Americans don't narrow down like this and get their high school diploma at 18. (That might mean a better general education - educationalists will happily argue forever about whether this is a good thing!) But that isn't good enough to get into a British university. A British university will want them to have done some Advanced Placement subjects, because only those will get you to A level standard, and it's good AP grades the university wants to see. So if you're thinking of coming to the UK to study, look around on the web sites of universities you're interested in. What they'll say for entry requirements for any particular course will be in terms of A levels, but if you haven't done A levels, you need to look further to find out what qualifications from your country they will accept instead.

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